A New Old Door for the Pantry

A New Old Door for the Pantry - Charleston Crafted

Since reading their book, I have really gotten into watching Fixer Upper. I know, just a little behind the trend there! One thing I really love about Joanna’s designs is how she incorporates old things into new homes. Since we are wrapping up a kitchen remodel, I decided that this would be the perfect place to copy her idea by swapping out our pantry door for a new, old, refurbished door.

A New Old Door for the Pantry - Charleston Crafted

Once I decided that I wanted to purchase an old door, I knew exactly where I wanted to go. I have followed Sustainable Warehouse on Facebook for a while, but had never actually visited their warehouse. Sustainable Warehouse is a place that collects old home accents, like doors, windows, and furniture, and saves them from the landfill! They are located in North Charleston. Their model is not unique – do a web search to find a similar type location in your area!

We visited the warehouse a few weeks ago with the exact dimensions of our pantry door in hand. At 24″ by 80″, it is a narrow door so we had a limited selection, but they did have this solid wood door with glass panels. Hooray! It was a great deal at $40.

A New Old Door for the Pantry - Charleston Crafted

A New Old Door for the Pantry - Charleston Crafted

Once we got the door home, the work began. Sean sanded the entire thing really well and used a lot of wet paper towels to clean it up. He also dinged it up to look more weathered.

A New Old Door for the Pantry - Charleston Crafted

We stained the whole thing with my favorite gray stain, Minwax Weathered Oak. We then used a frosted glass spray on the glass panels to make them less see through and more opaque.

A New Old Door for the Pantry - Charleston Crafted

IMPORTANT TIP: STAIN BEFORE YOU DO THE GLASS PANES

We had an issue where the stain leaked onto the sprayed glass in a few places. We tried to scrape it off and then spray again, but it didn’t look right. We ended up scraping it all off and trying again. Then, after it had all dried and cured, the spray just looked like crap.

A New Old Door for the Pantry - Charleston Crafted

So we ended up going with frosted contact paper that we used in our master bathroom on the windows. We cut out each square and followed the directions to spray the glass with water, spread on the paper, then cut off the edges.

A New Old Door for the Pantry - Charleston Crafted

We had an issue when we first tried to hang the door too. We attached the hinges, but the door didn’t have cut outs for the hinges to inset. We thought that would be ok, but when we went to close the door, it was too wide. So, Sean had to use a chisel to cut out hinge gaps on the door. (We’ll share a separate post about how to do that later!) After he cut them out, the hinges went right in and we attached the door to the door frame with no problems.

A New Old Door for the Pantry - Charleston Crafted

A New Old Door for the Pantry - Charleston Crafted

A New Old Door for the Pantry - Charleston Crafted

There were two final touches to go. We didn’t want to install a regular doorknob, so we installed a dummy knob, which is simply just the front of a door knob that doesn’t turn. We popped that on no problems.

Last step was to add a magnetic latch to keep the door closed. Half the magnet on the door, half on the door jamb. It holds perfectly and opens up with just a slight pull on the dummy knob.

A New Old Door for the Pantry - Charleston Crafted

Annnnnd it looks so rustic and awesome.

A New Old Door for the Pantry - Charleston Crafted

A New Old Door for the Pantry - Charleston Crafted

A New Old Door for the Pantry - Charleston Crafted

A New Old Door for the Pantry - Charleston Crafted

And with that, our kitchen is DONE. We have done so much in this kitchen, from laying floors, to painting our cabinets, to hanging crown molding and extending the cabinets to the ceiling, to our new counters. We will bring you guys a full wrap up and kitchen reveal soon, but we’re SO EXCITED the the kitchen is done. It’s been a long process, but it looks so incredible.

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Relocating the Cabinet Above the Fridge

Relocating the Cabinet Above the Fridge - Charleston Crafted

Raise your hand if you’re one of the many lucky people who has a cabinet above their refrigerator that they can’t access because it’s three feet back and super high up? My hand is raised, well both of them are, as I’m trying to access that ridiculous choice of a cabinet spot. As we wrap up our kitchen remodel, we had to do something about relocating the cabinet above the fridge. It was unusable and looked chinsy. So we made some improvements.

Relocating the Cabinet Above the Fridge - Charleston Crafted

First things first, we removed it from the wall, which was just four screws through the cabinet walls and into the studs. The cabinet was much less deep than it seemed from the ground.

Relocating the Cabinet Above the Fridge - Charleston Crafted

Relocating the Cabinet Above the Fridge - Charleston Crafted

We took off the doors and painted them and the front of the cabinet the same way we did the rest of the cabinets in our kitchen a couple of months ago.

Relocating the Cabinet Above the Fridge - Charleston Crafted

After letting them cure, it was time to put the cabinet back up. We had run the crown molding in the kitchen straight across the fridge gap at the top because we knew we were eventually going to get to this project. We secured the molding in with a 2×4 that we put the cabinet flush up against. The only problem is that we overestimated the quality of craftsmanship that this house had from its original builders. Wouldn’t you know it, but the front of the gap was 3/4 inch smaller than the back of the gap. Soooooo instead of the cabinet going flush with the wall, its edges hang over ever so slightly on each side. Oh well. It was either do that or shave off some cabinet and that didn’t seem worth it.

Relocating the Cabinet Above the Fridge - Charleston Crafted

Relocating the Cabinet Above the Fridge - Charleston Crafted

That was no big deal, we just painted the two outside edges and voila. The problem was that, now that the cabinet was all the way at the front, it looked like crap from underneath. We were thinking it would look fine, but it really really didn’t.

Relocating the Cabinet Above the Fridge - Charleston Crafted

So we had to decide what to do. We came up with idea of running a piece of board along the bottom of the cabinet to fit the entire space. We settled on bead board and cut it to the exact dimensions of the fridge gap (including the 3/4 size difference from front to back, sigh).

To hang it, we drilled in some scrap wood into the sides and back of the gap that would be level with the bottom of the cabinet.

Relocating the Cabinet Above the Fridge - Charleston Crafted

Then, we attached the bead board straight into the bottom of the cabinet and the pieces of wood on the sides.

Relocating the Cabinet Above the Fridge - Charleston Crafted

Relocating the Cabinet Above the Fridge - Charleston Crafted

Finished that off with spackle to fill the holes and paint to make it match and all the sudden it looks like we have a super deep cabinet above our fridge.

Relocating the Cabinet Above the Fridge - Charleston Crafted

Relocating the Cabinet Above the Fridge - Charleston Crafted

Relocating the Cabinet Above the Fridge - Charleston Crafted

Relocating the cabinet above the fridge was a great idea. The bottom shelf is easily reachable (for me, not so much for Morgan) and the top shelf is reachable with a step stool. Before, neither were. We still are storing our infrequently used items in there, but it’s great that the cabinet looks great and is usable.

Only ONE more kitchen project to go!

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How to Hang a Tile Bar Glass Subway Tile Kitchen Backsplash

How to Hang a Tile Bar Glass Subway Tile Kitchen Backsplash - Charleston Crafted

We are winding up our kitchen make over, and one of the last big projects was adding a tile back splash. I envisioned a sea glass look that would tie into our recycled glass counter tops. I ordered samples from a few tile places, all in shades of blue & green. It was easy for me to decide that I loved the 3×6″ glass subway tile from Tile Bar the most. I debated a few different shades, but really fell for the frosted glass look. So, I decided to go with the Loft Seafoam 3X6 Frosted Glass Tile from Tile Bar. We feel so lucky that Tile Bar wanted to partner with us and offered to send us the tile.

How to Hang a Tile Bar Glass Subway Tile Kitchen Backsplash - Charleston Crafted

Hanging a glass tile back splash is really easy, but just a little bit time consuming. We started by watching a few videos to get the best tips ourselves and here’s one that’s good for glass subway tiles.

What you need:

  • Newspaper or plastic
  • Painters tape
  • Mortar
  • Mortar spreader
  • Bucket + water
  • Mixing drill attachment
  • Wet saw
  • Tile spacers (we used 1/4″)
  • Tile for your square footage + 10% extra just in case
  • Unsanded grout
  • Grout float

What you do:

First, prep your work area.

  • Remove everything from the counter tops.
  • Pull out the stove or anything blocking your wall.
    How to Hang a Tile Bar Glass Subway Tile Kitchen Backsplash - Charleston Crafted
  • Use painters tape + newspaper to cover all of your surfaces. You will make a mess!
    How to Hang a Tile Bar Glass Subway Tile Kitchen Backsplash - Charleston Crafted
  • If your wall is painted, you can score the paint. We used a scoring tool but any sharp edge would do. (optional)
  • Use a drill to drill screws into the studs. This will hold the drywall extra-securely to the wall under the weight of the tile. (optional)
  • Turn off power to your outlets

Next, you will want to mortar. This is the glue that will hold the tile to the wall.

  • Mix your mortar according to the instructions on the package. This should require mixing the powder with water using a mixing attachment to your drill and you’ll mix a few minutes, wait a few minutes, then mix a couple of more minutes.
    How to Hang a Tile Bar Glass Subway Tile Kitchen Backsplash - Charleston Crafted
  • Using your mortar spreader, grab some globs of mixed mortar and spread it on a small section of wall. Spread enough for what you can do in 15 minutes or so.
    How to Hang a Tile Bar Glass Subway Tile Kitchen Backsplash - Charleston Crafted
    How to Hang a Tile Bar Glass Subway Tile Kitchen Backsplash - Charleston Crafted
  • Use a wet saw to cut your tiles in the patterns you need, being sure you’ve drawn the appropriate cuts for around your outlets.
    How to Hang a Tile Bar Glass Subway Tile Kitchen Backsplash - Charleston Crafted
  • Place your tiles in the pattern you choose (we chose a 50-50 split on each level) and place your tile spacers in between.
    How to Hang a Tile Bar Glass Subway Tile Kitchen Backsplash - Charleston Crafted
    How to Hang a Tile Bar Glass Subway Tile Kitchen Backsplash - Charleston Crafted
  • One tip for areas not up against a counter is to drill a piece of wood level across the wall for the tiles to rest on.
    How to Hang a Tile Bar Glass Subway Tile Kitchen Backsplash - Charleston Crafted
  • Let your tiles sit for 24 hours to solidify.

The next step is to grout. If you have glass tile, you want unsanded grout – the sand can scratch the tile!

  • After waiting 24 hours, mix your grout according to the package instructions. It should be roughly the same as the mortar mix.
  • Spread the grout all over your beautiful new tiles. Yes, it’s sad. I was terrified when I started spreading this gross stuff all over the gorgeous tiles I had just laid yesterday. Sigh. But it’s ok. Spread the grout in small areas and try to go over all the lines from multiple directions to try to get the grout into the lines as best as possible.
    How to Hang a Tile Bar Glass Subway Tile Kitchen Backsplash - Charleston Crafted
    How to Hang a Tile Bar Glass Subway Tile Kitchen Backsplash - Charleston Crafted
  • Use the edge of the grout float to scrape flat across the surface of your tile to wipe some of it away as best as possible.
  • Once you’re completely done grouting, use a sponge, dipped in water and wrung out so it’s only a little damp, to wipe your tiles clean. Try to wipe in just one direction so you aren’t spreading the grout back over the areas you just wiped. Continuously clean off your sponge and do this over and over again. Once it looks pretty clean, let everything dry for 24 hours.
    How to Hang a Tile Bar Glass Subway Tile Kitchen Backsplash - Charleston Crafted
    How to Hang a Tile Bar Glass Subway Tile Kitchen Backsplash - Charleston Crafted
  • Next you want to de-haze the tile to remove the lingering film of grout. We used de-haze gloves. You can also use the spray and a soft cloth.

The final step is to seal your grout.

  • Apply the sealant to your grout. Let sit according to the directions on your packaging. This will help protect the grout from being stained.
    How to Hang a Tile Bar Glass Subway Tile Kitchen Backsplash - Charleston Crafted
  • Then caulk the bottom and top of the tile to the wall and counter so it looks like a smooth transition.
    How to Hang a Tile Bar Glass Subway Tile Kitchen Backsplash - Charleston Crafted

In the end, it looks AMAZING!

How to Hang a Tile Bar Glass Subway Tile Kitchen Backsplash - Charleston Crafted

How to Hang a Tile Bar Glass Subway Tile Kitchen Backsplash - Charleston Crafted

How to Hang a Tile Bar Glass Subway Tile Kitchen Backsplash - Charleston Crafted

How to Hang a Tile Bar Glass Subway Tile Kitchen Backsplash - Charleston Crafted

How to Hang a Tile Bar Glass Subway Tile Kitchen Backsplash - Charleston Crafted

We don’t have too much kitchen work left. I need to take down the cabinet over the fridge & paint and reconfigure it a little bit, but other than that it is just tweaks. I am planning to do a great big reveal when it is totally done – and I can’t wait to share it with you!


Thank you to Tile Bar for providing the tile for our back splash. All opinions are true & my own. Thanks for supporting the brands that make Charleston Crafted possible. 

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How to Restore an Old Wooden Cutting Board

How to Restore an Old Cutting Board - Charleston Crafted

Cutting boards get worn out pretty quick, especially if you’re using one made of wood. Luckily, they can also be restored pretty quickly. Morgan found a beautiful wood cutting board at Goodwill that needed a little love, so she brought it home and it’s now a beautiful display piece in our home. In less than five minutes, I’ll show you how to restore and old cutting board and then you can do it yourself in that same time.

The two things that usually need fixing with an old cutting board is the knife marks and the discoloration. First, work on the knife marks. I used two different grits of sandpaper for this part. First, I used 80 grit to buff away those deep marks and try to bring the whole board back to level height. Once I achieved that, I switched to 120 grit to give the board that nice smooth finish.

How to Restore an Old Cutting Board - Charleston Crafted

How to Restore an Old Cutting Board - Charleston Crafted

After sanding, I wiped away the dust particles and then poured a few arcs of cutting board oil to the surface.

How to Restore an Old Cutting Board - Charleston Crafted

How to Restore an Old Cutting Board - Charleston Crafted

Then, using a cloth, I spread the oil around evenly to the top and sides of the board.

How to Restore an Old Cutting Board - Charleston Crafted

How to Restore an Old Cutting Board - Charleston Crafted

How to Restore an Old Cutting Board - Charleston Crafted

After waiting 20 minutes, I wiped away excess and let it dry. See how the oil brought out the color without staining it? Ta-da, turned out pretty good.

How to Restore an Old Cutting Board - Charleston Crafted

If you’ve been dinging up your wooden cutting boards and want to restore them to their original glory, it’s super simple. This will give new live to your cutting boards and allow them to last a lot longer.

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How to Make ANY Cabinet or Drawer Slow Close

How to Make ANY Cabinet or Drawer Slow Close - Charleston Crafted

A big part of any renovation is budgeting. With our kitchen renovation, we had to choose what to spend on and what to save on. After deciding that I wanted expensive countertops, and that we would keep pretty much the same layout, it really made financial sense to keep our existing cabinets. We painted them and changed out the knobs, but I really wanted another upgrade – slow close cabinets! I think that it is a luxurious upgrade and I was very excited to figure out how easy it was to add slow close to my cabinets and drawers.

How to Make ANY Cabinet or Drawer Slow Close - Charleston Crafted

Slow Close Drawers

Come to find out, you don’t need to buy special cabinets to get slow close drawers and doors. They sell the hardware to do it on Amazon, making this a simple and fairly cheap, but big, upgrade. To make slow close drawers, you install one piece inside the cabinet on the wall and one piece onto the drawer. The old hardware remains in place. The slow close basically is the result of the piece on the drawer catching the piece on the wall and then slowly closing. It was supposed to be really easy, but as always seems to be the case with us, we ran into a glitch. The slow close rods for the wall are supposed to line up exactly with the drawer slides. Well, ours aren’t mounted straight onto the cabinet wall. Instead, there is a gap, so we first had to drill a piece of 1×4 onto the cabinet wall and then attach the slow close rod onto that piece of wood.

How to Install Slow Close Drawers - Charleston Crafted

How to Install Slow Close Drawers - Charleston Crafted

Then we had to line up the plastic piece that goes onto the outside of the drawer itself and make sure it lined up with the rod.

How to Install Slow Close Drawers - Charleston Crafted

Once both were in place, you could try to slam the drawer closed and instead it would melt into the cabinets like butter.

Slow Close Cabinets

Updating the cabinets was much simpler than updating the drawers. All I needed to do was remove one hinge and replace it with a slow close hinge. Seriously, unscrew 3 screws, pop out the hinge, and screw in 3 new screws. So easy!

How to Make ANY Cabinet or Drawer Slow Close - Charleston Crafted

How to Make ANY Cabinet or Drawer Slow Close - Charleston Crafted

I am obsessed with the new slow close features. It makes me feel so fancy, and I love love how inexpensive and easy it was! We are getting close to being done with our kitchen, y’all, and I can’t wait to share!

 

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